Archive for December, 2011

Drop the last year into the silent limbo of the past. Let it go, for it was imperfect, and thank God that it can go…

December 31, 2011

Brooks Atkinson

Justin Brooks Atkinson (November 28, 1894 – January 14, 1984) was an American theatre critic. He worked for The New York Times from 1925 to 1960. In his obituary, the Times called him “the most important reviewer of his time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooks_Atkinson

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if you really want to do something, you’ll find a way. If you dont, you’ll find an excuse…

December 30, 2011

Jim Rohn

Jim Rohn (September 17, 1930 – December 5, 2009) was an American entrepreneur, author and motivational speaker. His rags to riches story played a large part in his work, which influenced others in the personal development industry.

The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance – it is the illusion of knowledge…

December 29, 2011

Daniel J. Boorstin

Daniel Joseph Boorstin (October 1, 1914 – February 28, 2004) was an American historian, professor, attorney, and writer. He was appointed twelfth Librarian of the United States Congress from 1975 until 1987.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_J._Boorstin

It’s never too late to be who you might have been…

December 28, 2011

George Eliot

Mary Anne (Mary Ann, Marian) Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), better known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, journalist and translator, and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She is the author of seven novels, including Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871–72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of them set in provincial England and well known for their realism and psychological insight.

She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure her works be taken seriously. Female authors were published under their own names during Eliot’s life, but she wanted to escape the stereotype of women only writing lighthearted romances. An additional factor in her use of a pen name may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny and to prevent scandals attending her relationship with the married George Henry Lewes, with whom she lived for over 20 years

What we see depends mainly on what we look for…

December 26, 2011

John Lubbock

John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury PC (Privy Councilor), FRS (Fellow of the Royal Society) (30 April 1834 – 28 May 1913), known as Sir John Lubbock, 4th Baronet from 1865 until 1900, was a polymath and Liberal Member of Parliament. He was a banker and worked with his family’s company, but was also involved with entomology, botany, biology, archaeology, and ethnography. He helped establish archaeology as a scientific discipline, and was also influential with nineteenth-century debates concerning evolutionary theory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Lubbock,_1st_Baron_Avebury

Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction…

December 24, 2011

John F. Kennedy

Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck…

December 22, 2011

H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

H. Jackson Brown, Jr. is an American author best known for his inspirational book, Life’s Little Instruction Book, which was a New York Times bestseller (1991–1994). Its sequel Life’s Little Instruction Book: Volume 2 also made it to the same best seller list in 1993.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._Jackson_Brown,_Jr.

Work like you don’t need the money, love like you’ve never been hurt and dance like no one is watching…

December 21, 2011

Randall G Leighton

LIVE life. No one at the end of their life, says “I should have put more time in at work.”…

December 20, 2011

Anon

Go confidently in the direction of your dreams! Live the life you’ve imagined…

December 19, 2011

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (born David Henry Thoreau; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) (pronounced like the word thorough, with emphasis on the first syllable)[1][2] was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, and leading transcendentalist. He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_David_Thoreau