Archive for the ‘Writer’ Category

The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours – it is an amazing journey – and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins…

March 4, 2012

Bob Moawad

Without leaps of imagination, or dreaming, we lose the excitement of possibilities. Dreaming, after all, is a form of planning…

February 29, 2012

Gloria Steinem

Gloria Marie Steinem (born March 25, 1934) is an American feminist, journalist, and social and political activist who became nationally recognized as a leader of, and media spokeswoman for, the women’s liberation movement in the late 1960s and 1970s. A prominent writer and political figure, Steinem has founded many organizations and projects and has been the recipient of many awards and honors. She was a columnist for New York magazine and co-founded Ms. magazine. In 1969, she published an article, “After Black Power, Women’s Liberation” which, along with her early support of abortion rights, catapulted her to national fame as a feminist leader. In 2005, Steinem worked alongside Jane Fonda and Robin Morgan to co-found the Women’s Media Center, an organization that works to amplify the voices of women in the media through advocacy, media and leadership training, and the creation of original content. Steinem currently serves on the board of the organization. She continues to involve herself in politics and media affairs as a commentator, writer, lecturer, and organizer, campaigning for candidates and reforms and publishing books and articles.

Nobody has ever measured, not even poets, how much the heart can hold…

February 14, 2012

Zelda Fitzgerald

Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (July 24, 1900 – March 10, 1948), born Zelda Sayre (“Sayre” is pronounced to rhyme with “fair”) in Montgomery, Alabama, was an American novelist and the wife of writer F. Scott Fitzgerald. She was an icon of the 1920s—dubbed by her husband “the first American Flapper”. After the success of his first novel, This Side of Paradise (1920), the Fitzgeralds became celebrities. The newspapers of New York saw them as embodiments of the Jazz Age and the Roaring Twenties: young, seemingly wealthy, beautiful, and energetic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zelda_Fitzgerald

Every artist was first an amateur…

February 7, 2012

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Waldo_Emerson

Live out of your imagination, not your history…

February 4, 2012

Stephen Covey

Stephen Richards Covey (born October 24, 1932 in Salt Lake City, Utah) is the author of the best-selling book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. Other books he has written include First Things First, Principle-Centered Leadership, and The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Families. In 2004, Covey released The 8th Habit. In 2008, Covey released The Leader In Me—How Schools and Parents Around the World Are Inspiring Greatness, One Child at a Time. He is a professor at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Covey

We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the life that is waiting for us…

February 3, 2012

Joseph Campbell

Joseph John Campbell (March 26, 1904 – October 30, 1987) was an American mythologist, writer and lecturer, best known for his work in comparative mythology and comparative religion. His work is vast, covering many aspects of the human experience. His philosophy is often summarized by his phrase: “Follow your bliss.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Campbell

 

Life begins at the end of your comfort zone…

February 2, 2012

Neale Donald Walsch

Neale Donald Walsch (b. September 10, 1943), is an American author of the series Conversations with God. The nine books in the complete series are Conversations With God (books 1-3), Friendship with God, Communion with God, Conversations With God for Teens, The New Revelations, Tomorrow’s God, and Home with God: In a Life That Never Ends.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neale_Donald_Walsch

If we don’t change, we don’t grow. If we don’t grow, we aren’t really living.

January 29, 2012

Gail Sheehy

Gail Sheehy (born November 15, 1937, Mamaroneck, New York) is an American writer and lecturer, most notable for her books on life and the life cycle. She is also a contributor to Vanity Fair magazine.

Her fifth book, Passages, was called “a road map of adult life”. Several of her books continue the theme of passages through life’s stages, including menopause and what she calls “Second Adulthood”, including Pathfinders, Spirit of Survival, and Menopause: The Silent Passage. Her latest book, Sex and the Seasoned Woman, reveals a hidden cultural phenomenon: a surge of vitality in women’s sex and love lives after age fifty. She wrote a biography of Hillary Rodham Clinton, Hillary’s Choice. Her novel Middletown, America is being adapted as a TV miniseries.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gail_Sheehy

Always walk through life as if you have something new to learn and you will…

January 23, 2012

Vernon Howard

Vernon Linwood Howard (March 16, 1918 – August 23, 1992) was an American spiritual teacher, author, and philosopher.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernon_Howard

An intellectual says a simple thing in a hard way. An artist says a hard thing in a simple way…

January 20, 2012

Charles Bukowski

Henry Charles Bukowski (born Heinrich Karl Bukowski; August 16, 1920 – March 9, 1994) was an American poet, novelist and short story writer. His writing was influenced by the social, cultural and economic ambience of his home city of Los Angeles. It is marked by an emphasis on the ordinary lives of poor Americans, the act of writing, alcohol, relationships with women and the drudgery of work. Bukowski wrote thousands of poems, hundreds of short stories and six novels, eventually publishing over sixty books. In 1986 Time called Bukowski a “laureate of American lowlife”. Regarding Bukowski’s enduring popular appeal, Adam Kirsch of The New Yorker wrote, “the secret of Bukowski’s appeal. . . [is that] he combines the confessional poet’s promise of intimacy with the larger-than-life aplomb of a pulp-fiction hero.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Bukowski