Archive for December, 2009

I think an artist’s responsibility is more complex than people realize.

December 30, 2009

Jodie Foster

Alicia Christian Foster, better known as Jodie Foster (born November 19, 1962), is an American actor, film director and producer.

Foster began acting in commercials at 3 years old, and her first significant role came in the 1976 film Taxi Driver as the preteen prostitute, Iris, for which she received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. She won an Academy Award for Best Actress in 1989 for playing a rape survivor in The Accused. In 1991, she starred in The Silence of the Lambs as Clarice Starling, a gifted FBI trainee, assisting in a hunt for a serial killer. This performance received international acclaim and her second Academy Award for Best Actress. She received her fourth Academy Award nomination for playing a backwoods hermit in Nell (1994). Other popular films include Maverick (1994), Contact (1997), Panic Room (2002), Flightplan (2005), Inside Man (2006), The Brave One (2007) and Nim’s Island (2008).

Foster’s films have spanned a wide variety of genres, from family films to horror. She has also won three Bafta Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, a Screen Actors Guild Award, a People’s Choice Award, and has received two Emmy nominations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jodie_Foster

The essence of all art is to have pleasure in giving pleasure.

December 29, 2009

Dale Carnegie

Dale Breckenridge Carnegie (originally Carnagey until 1922 and possibly somewhat later) (November 24, 1888 – November 1, 1955) was an American writer and lecturer and the developer of famous courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, public speaking and interpersonal skills. Born in poverty on a farm in Missouri, he was the author of How to Win Friends and Influence People, first published in 1936, a massive bestseller that remains popular today. He also wrote a biography of Abraham Lincoln, titled Lincoln the Unknown, and several other books.

Carnegie was an early proponent of what is now called responsibility assumption, although this only appears minutely in his written work.[citation needed] One of the core ideas in his books is that it is possible to change other people’s behavior by changing one’s reaction to them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale_Carnegie

An artist is a dreamer consenting to dream of the actual world.

December 28, 2009

George Santayana

George Santayana (December 16, 1863, Madrid, Spain – September 26, 1952, Rome, Italy), was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. A lifelong Spanish citizen, Santayana was raised and educated in the United States, wrote in English and is generally considered an American man of letters. Of his nearly 89 years, he spent 39 in the U.S. Santayana is perhaps best known as an aphorist, most famously for his oft-misquoted remark “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it,” (sometimes called Santayana’s Law of Repetitive Consequences). Similarly, a quote of Santayana’s: “Only the dead have seen the end of war.” is often falsely attributed to Plato.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Santayana

In the depth of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer.

December 27, 2009

Albert Camus

Albert Camus (French pronunciation: [albɛʁ kamy]) (7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French author, philosopher, and journalist who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957. He is often cited as a proponent of existentialism (the philosophy that he was associated with during his own lifetime), but Camus himself refused this particular label. Specifically, his views contributed to the rise of the more current philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay The Rebel that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom.

In 1949, Camus founded the Group for International Liaisons within the Revolutionary Union Movement, which (according to the book Albert Camus, une vie by Olivier Todd) was a group opposed to some tendencies of the surrealistic movement of André Breton. Camus was the second-youngest recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature (after Rudyard Kipling) when he became the first Africa-born writer to receive the award, in 1957. He is also the shortest-lived of any literature laureate to date, having died in an automobile accident just over two years after receiving the award.

In an interview in 1945, Camus rejected any ideological associations: “No, I am not an existentialist. Sartre and I are always surprised to see our names linked…”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Camus

Delay is the deadliest form of denial.

December 26, 2009

British Historian C. Northcote Parkinson

Cyril Northcote Parkinson (July 30, 1909 – March 9, 1993) was a British historian and author of some sixty books. Besides his numerous works on British politics and economics, he also wrote historical fiction, often based on the Napoleonic period, and sea stories. He is most famous for his ridicule of bureaucratic institutions, notably his Parkinson’s Law and Other Studies, a collection of short essays explaining the inevitability of bureaucratic expansion. As early as the 1930’s, for example, Parkinson had successfully predicted that the Royal Navy would eventually have more admirals than ships.

Parkinson’s first fictional effort, a “biography” of fictional sea captain Horatio Hornblower, met with considerable acclaim and led to his series of books about seafaring adventurer Richard Delancey.

http://www.answers.com/topic/c-northcote-parkinson

Christmas, my child, is love in action. Every time we love, every time we give, it’s Christmas.

December 25, 2009

Dale Evans

Dale Evans was the stage name of Lucille Wood Smith (October 31, 1912 – February 7, 2001), a writer, movie star, and singer-songwriter. She was the second wife of singing cowboy Roy Rogers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale_Evans

Remember, if Christmas isn’t found in your heart, you won’t find it under a tree.

December 24, 2009

Charlotte Carpenter

Art is either plagiarism or revolution.

December 23, 2009

Paul Gauguin

Manao tupapau – The Spirit of the Dead Keep Watch 1892

Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. His bold experimentation with colouring led directly to the Synthetist style of modern art while his expression of the inherent meaning of the subjects in his paintings, under the influence of the cloisonnist style, paved the way to Primitivism and the return to the pastoral. He was also an influential exponent of wood engraving and woodcuts as art forms.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Gauguin

Let us consider that we are all insane. It will explain us to each other; it will unriddle many riddles.

December 22, 2009

Mark Twain

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. Twain is most noted for his novels Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which has since been called the Great American Novel, and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. He is extensively quoted. During his lifetime, Twain became a friend to presidents, artists, industrialists, and European royalty.

Twain enjoyed immense public popularity. His keen wit and incisive satire earned him praise from both critics and peers. William Faulkner called Twain “the father of American literature”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Twain

Let me ask you something, what is not art?

December 21, 2009

Author Unknown