Archive for February, 2009

A man of genius has a right to any mode of expression.

February 28, 2009

Ezra Pound

 

Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (October 30, 1885 – November 1, 1972) was an American expatriate poet, critic and intellectual who was a major figure of the Modernist movement in the first half of the 20th century. The critic Hugh Kenner said of Pound upon meeting him: “I suddenly knew that I was in the presence of the center of modernism.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ezra_Pound

I prefer drawing to talking. Drawing is faster, and leaves less room for lies.

February 27, 2009

Le Corbusier

Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, who chose to be known as Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965), was a Swiss-French architect, designer, urbanist, writer and also painter, who is famous for being one of the pioneers of what now is called Modern architecture or the International Style. He was born in Switzerland and became a French citizen in his 30s.

He was a pioneer in studies of modern high design and was dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities. His career spanned five decades, with his buildings constructed throughout central Europe, India, Russia, and one each in North and South America. He was also an urban planner, painter, sculptor, writer, and modern furniture designer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Corbusier

If you could say it in words there would be no reason to paint.

February 26, 2009

Edward Hopper

Summer Interior 1909

Edward Hopper painted American landscapes and cityscapes with a disturbing truth, expressing the world around him as a chilling, alienating, and often vacuous place. Everybody in a Hopper picture appears terribly alone. Hopper soon gained a widespread reputation as the artist who gave visual form to the loneliness and boredom of life in the big city. This was something new in art, perhaps an expression of the sense of human hopelessness that characterized the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Edward Hopper has something of the lonely gravity peculiar to Thomas Eakins, a courageous fidelity to life as he feels it to be. He also shares Winslow Homer’s power to recall the feel of things. For Hopper, this feel is insistently low-key and ruminative. He shows the modern world unflinchingly; even its gaieties are gently mournful, echoing the disillusionment that swept across the country after the start of the Great Depression in 1929. Cape Cod Evening (1939; 77 x 102 cm (30 1/4 x 40 in)) should be idyllic, and in a way it is. The couple enjoy the evening sunshine outside their home, yet they are a couple only technically and the enjoyment is wholly passive as both are isolated and introspective in their reveries. Their house is closed to intimacy, the door firmly shut and the windows covered. The dog is the only alert creature, but even it turns away from the house. The thick, sinister trees tap on the window panes, but there will be no answer.

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/hopper/

An artist is somebody who produces things that people don’t need to have.

February 23, 2009

Andy Warhol

Knives 1981-82

Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987), more commonly known as Andy Warhol, was an American painter, filmmaker and conceptual artist, who was a leading figure in the movement known as pop art. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became famous worldwide for his work as a painter, avant-garde filmmaker, record producer, author, and public figure known for his membership in wildly diverse social circles that included bohemian street people, distinguished intellectuals, Hollywood celebrities and wealthy aristocrats.

Warhol has been the subject of numerous retrospective exhibitions, books, and feature and documentary films.

Warhol coined the concept of “15 minutes of fame”, which refers to the fleeting condition of fame in the modern world, mainly attributed to mass media and transience in human beings.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Warhol

I believe art has to take responsibility but it should not give up being art.

February 22, 2009

Anslem Kiefer

Naglfar 1998

Kiefer, Anselm (born 1945), German painter, born in Donaueschingen; 1966 left law studies at Univ. of Freiburg to study at art academies in Freiburg, Karlsruhe, Dusseldorf; made huge paintings using symbolic photographic images to deal ironically with 20th-c. German history; developed array of visual symbols commenting on tragic aspects of German history and culture, particularly Nazi period; in 1970s painted series of landscapes that capture rutted, somber German countryside; paintings of 1980s acquired physical presence through use of perspective devices and unusual textures; broadened themes to include references to ancient Hebrew and Egyptian history.

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/kiefer/

When I think of art I think of beauty. Beauty is the mystery of life. It is not in the eye it is in the mind. In our minds there is awareness of perfection.

February 21, 2009

Agnes Martin

Agnes Martin, On A Clear Day

On A Clear Day 1973

Agnes Martin was born in Maklin, Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1912. After spending her youth in Vancouver, she moved to the United States in 1931 and became a US citizen in 1950. In 1954 she moved to Taos, New Mexico. Returning to New York in 1957, she has held her first solo exhibition in 1958 at the Betty Parsons Gallery. In 1967 she moved back to New Mexico and abandoned painting for seven years. In 1975 she began her association with the Pace Gallery in New York. In 1991 the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam held an exhibition of her paintings and drawings which travelled on to various other European museums. In 1992 the Whitney Museum of American Art held a grand retrospective of her work. She lives and works in Galisteo, New Mexico.

http://www.studiocleo.com/gallerie/martin/martin.html

Creative people … have made their seemingly most self-indulgent artistic whims into a career.

February 20, 2009

Steve Purcell

Sam & Max

Steve Purcell is an American comic book writer, animator and game designer. He is most widely known as the creator of Sam & Max, an independent comic book series about a pair of anthropomorphic animal vigilantes and private investigators, for which Purcell received an Eisner Award in 2007. The series has since grown to incorporate an animated television series and several video games. A graduate of the California College of Arts and Craft, Purcell began his career creating comic strips for the college newsletter. He later performed freelance work for Marvel Comics and Fishwrap Productions before publishing his first Sam & Max comic in 1987. In 1988, Purcell was hired by LucasArts as an artist and animator, working on several titles within the company’s adventure games era.

Purcell collaborated with Nelvana to create a Sam & Max television series in 1997, and briefly worked as an animator for Industrial Light & Magic after leaving LucasArts. He is currently employed in the story development department at Pixar. His main work for the animation studio has been with the 2006 film Cars and spin-off materials such as shorts and video games. Despite his employment with Pixar, Purcell has continued to work with comic books and came together with Telltale Games in 2005 to bring about new series of Sam & Max video games.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Purcell

Only a bad artist thinks he has a good idea. A good artist does not need anything.

February 19, 2009

Ad Reinhardt 

Abstract Painting 1951-2

Adolph Frederick Reinhardt studied at the National Academy of Design in New York and then joined the abstract, avant-garde group, the American Abstract Artists. Influenced by Indian art and a desire to create a distinctive style, Reinhardt split from this group and developed his own style of geometric abstraction. After meeting Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman in the 1940’s, he began working in layers of shapes, primarily rectangles. This gradually gave rise to his Minimalist phase, which sparked the movement in the 1960’s.

http://wwar.com/masters/r/reinhardt-ad.html

It is not enough to know your craft – you have to have feeling. Science is all very well, but for us imagination is worth far more.

February 18, 2009

Edouard Manet

The Picnic (“Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe”). 1862-63

French painter and printmaker who in his own work accomplished the transition from the realism of Gustave Courbet to Impressionism. Manet broke new ground in choosing subjects from the events and appearances of his own time and in stressing the definition of painting as the arrangement of paint areas on a canvas over and above its function as representation. Exhibited in 1863 at the Salon des Refusés, his Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe (“Luncheon on the Grass”) aroused the hostility of the critics and the enthusiasm of a group of young painters who later formed the nucleus of the Impressionists. His other notable works include Olympia (1863) and A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (1882).

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/manet/

There is no must in art because art is free.

February 16, 2009

Wassily Kandinsky

On White ll 1923

Russian painter, whose exploration of the possibilities of abstraction make him one of the most important innovators in modern art. Both as an artist and as a theorist he played a pivotal role in the development of abstract art.
Born in Moscow, December 4, 1866, Kandinsky studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich, Germany, from 1896 to 1900. His early paintings were executed in a naturalistic style, but in 1909, after a trip to Paris during which he was highly impressed by the works of the Fauves and postimpressionists, his paintings became more highly colored and loosely organized. Around 1913 he began working on paintings that came to be considered the first totally abstract works in modern art; they made no reference to objects of the physical world and derived their inspiration and titles from music.
In 1911, along with Franz Marc and other German expressionists, Kandinsky formed Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group (so called for Kandinsky’s love of blue and Marc’s love of horses). He produced both abstract and figurative works during this period, all of which were characterized by brilliant colors and complex patterns.
Kandinsky’s influence on the course of 20th-century art was further increased by his activities as a theorist and teacher. In 1912 he published Concerning the Spiritual in Art, the first theoretical treatise on abstraction, which spread his ideas through Europe. He also taught at the Moscow Academy of Fine Arts from 1918 to 1921 and at the Bauhaus in Dessau, Germany, from 1922 to 1933.
After World War I (1914-1918), Kandinsky’s abstractions became increasingly geometric in form, as he abandoned his earlier fluid style in favor of sharply etched outlines and clear patterns. Composition VIII No. 260, for instance, is composed solely of lines, circles, arcs, and other simple geometric forms. In very late works such as Circle and Square, he refines this style into a more elegant, complex mode that resulted in beautifully balanced, jewel-like pictures.
He was one of the most influential artists of his generation. As one of the first explorers of the principles of nonrepresentational or “pure” abstraction, Kandinsky can be considered an artist who paved the way for abstract expressionism, the dominant school of painting since World War II (1939-1945). Kandinsky died in Neuilly-sur-Seine, a suburb of Paris, on December 13, 1944.

http://www.mcs.csuhayward.edu/~malek/Kandin.html