Archive for August, 2011

The only limit to your impact is your imagination and commitment…

August 29, 2011

Tony Robbins

Anthony “Tony” Robbins (born February 29, 1960) is an American self-help author and motivational speaker. He became well known through his infomercials and self-help books, Unlimited Power: The New Science Of Personal Achievement and Awaken The Giant Within. Robbins writes about subjects such as health and energy, overcoming fears, persuasive communication, and enhancing relationships. Robbins began his career learning from many different motivational speakers, and promoted seminars for his personal mentor, Jim Rohn. He is deeply influenced by neuro-linguistic programming and a variety of philosophies. Robbins’ books include Unlimited Power: The New Science of Personal Achievement and Awaken The Giant Within.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Robbins

The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance – it is the illusion of knowledge…

August 24, 2011

Daniel J. Boorstin

Daniel Joseph Boorstin (October 1, 1914 – February 28, 2004) was an American historian, professor, attorney, and writer. He was appointed twelfth Librarian of the United States Congress from 1975 until 1987.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_J._Boorstin

The sad fact is that more people are confined by their thoughts than are fed by them…

August 22, 2011

Dr. Jay Dishman

You can’t cross the sea merely by standing and staring at the water…

August 17, 2011

Rabindranath Tagore 

Rabindranath Tagore (Bengali: রবীন্দ্রনাথ ঠাকুর)α[›]β[›] (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941),γ[›] sobriquet Gurudev,δ[›] was a Bengali polymath who reshaped Bengali literature and music. Author of Gitanjali and its “profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful verse”, he was the first non-European Nobel laureate. His poetry in translation was viewed as spiritual, and this together with his mesmerizing persona gave him a prophet-like aura in the West. His “elegant prose and magical poetry” remain largely unknown outside Bengal.

A Pirali Brahmin from Kolkata, Tagore had been writing poetry since he was eight years old. At age 16, he published his first substantial poetry under the pseudonym Bhanushingho (“Sun Lio) and wrote his first short stories and dramas in 1877. Tagore achieved further note when he denounced the British Raj and supported Indian independence. His efforts endure in his vast canon and in the institution he founded, Visva-Bharati University.

Tagore modernised Bengali art by spurning rigid classical forms. His novels, stories, songs, dance-dramas, and essays spoke to political and personal topics. Gitanjali (Song Offerings), Gora (Fair-Faced), and Ghare-Baire (The Home and the World) are his best-known works, and his verse, short stories, and novels were acclaimed for their lyricism, colloquialism, naturalism, and contemplation. Tagore penned two national anthems: India’s Jana Gana Mana and Bangladesh’s Amar Shonar Bangla.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabindranath_Tagore

 

 

Don’t cater to the audience. Inspire the audience…

August 16, 2011

Ken Danby

Ken Danby, CM, O.Ont (March 6, 1940 – September 23, 2007) was a Canadian painter in the realist style.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Danby

I’d rather have huge success and huge failure than travel in the middle of the road…

August 15, 2011

Kevyn Aucoin

http://www.kevynaucoin.com/

Kevyn Aucoin (February 14, 1962 – May 7, 2002) was an American make-up artist and photographer.

Aim for more…

August 14, 2011

anon

You have to choose where you look, and in making that choice you eliminate entire worlds…

August 13, 2011

Barbara Bloom

photographer and conceptual artist Barbara Bloom,

http://www.artnet.com/artists/barbara-bloom/

There is a great deal of difference between an eager man who wants to read a book and the tired man who wants a book to read…

August 12, 2011

G. K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936) was an English writer. His prolific and diverse output included philosophy, ontology, poetry, playwrighting, journalism, public lecturing and debating, literary and art criticism, biography, Christian apologetics, and fiction, including fantasy and detective fiction. Chesterton has been called the “prince of paradox”. Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: “Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out.” For example, Chesterton wrote “Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it.”

Chesterton is well known for his reasoned apologetics and even some of those who disagree with him have recognized the universal appeal of such works as Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man. Chesterton, as a political thinker, cast aspersions on both progressivism and conservatism, saying, “The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected.’ Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an “orthodox” Christian, and came to identify such a position with Catholicism more and more, eventually converting to Roman Catholicism from Anglicanism. George Bernard Shaw, Chesterton’s “friendly enemy” according to Time, said of him, “He was a man of colossal genius”. Biographers have identified him as a successor to such Victorian authors as Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, John Henry Cardinal Newman, and John Ruskin.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Chesterton

Choice, not chance, determines destiny…

August 11, 2011

Bill Byrne

Clarence William “Bill” Byrne, II is the current athletic director of Texas A&M University, a position he has held since January 2003.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Byrne