Archive for April, 2011

I am not what I am, I am what I do with my hands…

April 30, 2011

Louise Bourgeois

Louise Joséphine Bourgeois (French pronunciation: [lwiz buʁʒwa]; 25 December 1911 – 31 May 2010), was a renowned French-American artist and sculptor, best known for her contributions to both modern and contemporary art, and for her spider structures, titled Maman, which resulted in her being nicknamed the Spiderwoman. She is recognized today as the founder of confessional art

In the late 1940s, after moving to New York City with her American husband, Robert Goldwater, she turned to sculpture. Though her works are abstract, they are suggestive of the human figure and express themes of betrayal, anxiety, and loneliness. Her work was wholly autobiographical, inspired by her childhood trauma of discovering that her English governess was also her father’s mistress.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Bourgeois

Not what man knows but what man feels, concerns art. All else is science.

April 29, 2011

Bernard Berenson

Bernard Berenson (June 26, 1865 – October 6, 1959) was an American art historian specializing in the Renaissance. He was a major figure in pioneering art attribution and therefore establishing the market for paintings by the “Old Masters”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Berenson

Art is work like any other discipline, and most artists and would-be artists and art lovers need to realize that.

April 28, 2011

Heidi Hehn

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/heidi-hehn.html

Develop what you lack…

April 27, 2011

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

Hungarian psychology professor, who emigrated to the United States at the age of 22. Now at Claremont Graduate University, he is the former head of the department of psychology at the University of Chicago and of the department of sociology and anthropology at Lake Forest College.

He is noted for both his work in the study of happiness and creativity and for his notoriously difficult name, but is best known as the architect of the notion of flow and for his years of research and writing on the topic. He is the author of many books and over 120 articles or book chapters. Martin Seligman, former president of the American Psychological Association, described Csikszentmihalyi as the world’s leading researcher on positive psychology. Csikszentmihalyi once said “Repression is not the way to virtue. When people restrain themselves out of fear, their lives are by necessity diminished. Only through freely chosen discipline can life be enjoyed and still kept within the bounds of reason.” His works are influential and are widely cited.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mihaly_Csikszentmihalyi

Whatever you are, be a good one…

April 26, 2011

Abraham Lincoln

We know what happens to people who stay in the middle of the road. They get run down…

April 25, 2011

Aneurin Bevan

Aneurin “Nye” Bevan (15 November 1897 – 6 July 1960) was a British Labour Party politician who was the Deputy Leader of the Labour Party from 1959 until his death in 1960. The son of a coal miner, Bevan was a lifelong champion of social justice and the rights of working people. He was a long-time Member of Parliament (MP), representing Ebbw Vale for 31 years, and became recognised as one of the leaders of the party’s left wing, and of left-wing British thought generally. His most famous accomplishment came when, as Minister of Health in the post-war Attlee government, he spearheaded the establishment of the National Health Service, which provides free medical care to all Britons. His first name is pronounced [aˈnəɨrɪn] in Welsh, typically /əˈnaɪrɪn/ in English.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aneurin_Bevan

I shut my eyes in order to see…

April 24, 2011

Paul Gauguin

Le Christ jaune/The Yellow Christ, 1889

Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (French pronunciation: [ɡoɡɛ̃]; 7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading French Post-Impressionist artist. He was an important figure in the Symbolist movement as a painter, sculptor, print-maker, ceramist, and writer. His bold experimentation with colouring led directly to the Synthetist style of modern art while his expression of the inherent meaning of the subjects in his paintings, under the influence of the cloisonnist style, paved the way to Primitivism and the return to the pastoral. He was also an influential proponent of wood engraving and woodcuts as art forms

All that we are not stares back at what we are…

April 23, 2011

W. H. Auden

Wystan Hugh Auden ( /ˈwɪstən ˈhjuː ˈɔːdən/; 21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973), who published as W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet born in England, later an American citizen, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. His work is noted for its stylistic and technical achievements, its engagement with moral and political issues, and its variety of tone, form and content. The central themes of his poetry are love, politics and citizenship, religion and morals, and the relationship between unique human beings and the anonymous, impersonal world of nature.

A lot of people have great ideas, but nothing in the world is cheaper than a good idea with no action…

April 22, 2011

Anonymous

Adventure isn’t hanging on a rope off the side of a mountain. Adventure is an attitude that we must apply to the day to day obstacles of life…

April 21, 2011

John Amatt

For over 30 years, John Amatt has led expeditions to remote regions of Northern Norway, Peru, Nepal, China, Greenland and has explored areas of the Arctic on six occasions, making many first ascents of previously unclimbed peaks. At the age of 20, John spent two weeks lashed to tiny ledges while making the first ever ascent of Europe’s highest and steepest mountain precipice – the 5000 foot “Vertical Mile” Troll Wall in Norway.

http://www.adventureattitude.com/bio.htm