Archive for July, 2010

Fall seven times, stand up eight…

July 31, 2010

Japanese proverb

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Our limitations and joys begin in our hearts. We can always replace negative with positive.

July 30, 2010

Betty Eadie

Betty (Jean) Eadie (born 1942) is a prominent American author of several books on near-death experiences (NDEs). Her best-known book is the #1 New York Times bestselling book, Embraced by the Light (1992). It describes her near-death experience. It is arguably the most detailed near-death account on record. It was followed by two other works: The Awakening Heart (1996), also a best-seller, and The Ripple Effect (1999), published independently.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betty_Eadie

There is no state of final fulfillment. Each change opens new doors and ushers in new possibilities.

July 29, 2010

Margo Adair

Margo Adair has been developing and teaching Applied Meditation for Intuitive Problem Solving for over 25 years. She maintains a private practice working with people individually and facilitating support groups.

http://www.margoadair.com/aboutmargo/aboutmargo.htm

A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

July 28, 2010

Confucius

Confucius was a Chinese thinker and social philosopher.

His philosophy emphasized personal and governmental morality, correctness of social relationships, justice and sincerity. These values gained prominence in China over other doctrines, such as Legalism (法家) or Taoism (道家) during the Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 220 CE). Confucius’ thoughts have been developed into a system of philosophy known as Confucianism (儒家). It was introduced to Europe by the Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci, who was the first to Latinise the name as “Confucius.”

His teachings may be found in the Analects of Confucius (論語), a collection of “brief aphoristic fragments”, which was compiled many years after his death. For nearly 2,000 years he was thought to be the editor or author of all the Five Classics (五經) such as the Classic of Rites (禮記) (editor), and the Spring and Autumn Annals (春秋) (author).

Kong Qiu (孔丘), as Confucius is commonly known, is a combination of his surname (孔) and his given name (丘), and he was also known as Zhong Ni (仲尼), which is his courtesy name. He was born in 551 BCE in the Lu state (This state was in the south of modern-day Shandong Province) in the later days of the Spring and Autumn Period. Confucius was from a warrior family. His father Shulianghe (叔梁紇) was a famous warrior who had military exploits in two battles and owned a fiefdom. Confucius lost his father when he was three years old, and then his mother Yan Zhengzai (顏徵在) took him and left the fiefdom because as a concubine (妾), she wanted to avoid mistreatment from Shulianghe’s formal wife. Thus, Confucius lived in poverty with his mother since childhood. With the support and encouragement of his mother, Confucius was very diligent in his studies. When Confucius was seventeen years old, his mother died as a result of illness and overwork. Three years later, Confucius married a young woman who was from the Qiguan family (亓官氏) of the Song state (宋). Though he had a mild tempered wife who loved him, he left his family to strive for his ideals. Confucius sought to revive the perfect virtue of Huaxia (Chinese civilization) and the classical properties of the Western Zhou Dynasty to build a great, harmonious and humanistic society.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confucius

Always remember, “if you cannot imagine it you cannot achieve it.”

July 27, 2010

Kathleen Arnason

Knock the ‘t’ off the ‘can’t.

July 26, 2010

Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson (18 September 1709 [O.S. 7 September] – 13 December 1784), often referred to as Dr Johnson, was a British author who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer. Johnson was a devout Anglican and committed Tory, and has been described as “arguably the most distinguished man of letters in English history”.He is also the subject of “the most famous single work of biographical art in the whole of literature”: James Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Johnson

Become who you are.

July 24, 2010

Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) was a 19th-century German philosopher and classical philologist. He wrote critical texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and aphorism.

Nietzsche’s influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism and postmodernism. His style and radical questioning of the value and objectivity of truth have resulted in much commentary and interpretation, mostly in the continental tradition. His key ideas include the death of God, perspectivism, the Übermensch, the eternal recurrence, and the will to power.

Nietzsche began his career as a classical philologist before turning to philosophy. At the age of 24 he was appointed to the Chair of Classical Philology at the University of Basel (the youngest individual to have held this position), but resigned in 1879 due to health problems that plagued him most of his life. In 1889 he went insane, living out his remaining years in the care of his mother and sister until his death in 1900.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Nietzsche

You teach a little by what you say. You teach most by what you are.

July 23, 2010

Henrietta Mears

Henrietta Cornelia Mears (October 23, 1890 – March 19, 1963) was a Christian educator and author who had a significant impact on evangelical Christianity in the 20th century.

She is best known for her work as Christian Education Director of First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood, California. Literally hundreds of men and women came out of her Sunday School program into full-time Christian service. She was a gifted educator and was known as “Teacher” by those in her program.

Mears also founded Gospel Light, a publishing company, and Forest Home, a Christian conference center. Among the many she influenced were Bill Bright and his wife Vonette, and Billy Graham. Her book, What the Bible is All About, has sold over three million copies.[citation needed]

Miss Mears never married. She died in her sleep at her home near the UCLA campus.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henrietta_Mears

Your only obligation in any lifetime is to be true to yourself. Being true to anyone else or anything else is not only impossible, but the mark of a fake messiah.

July 22, 2010

Richard Bach

Richard David Bach (born 23 June 1936) is an American writer. He is widely known as the author of the hugely popular 1970s best-sellers Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah, and others. His books espouse his philosophy that our apparent physical limits and mortality are merely appearance. He claims to be a direct descendant of Johann Sebastian Bach. He is noted for his love of flying and for his books related to air flight and flying in a metaphorical context. He had pursued flying as a hobby since the age of 17.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Bach

Always do what you are afraid to do.

July 21, 2010

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American philosopher, essayist, and poet, best remembered for leading the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. His teachings directly influenced the growing New Thought movement of the mid-1800s. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society.

Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of Transcendentalism in his 1836 essay, Nature. As a result of this ground-breaking work he gave a speech entitled The American Scholar in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. considered to be America’s “Intellectual Declaration of Independence”. Considered one of the great orators of the time, Emerson’s enthusiasm and respect for his audience enraptured crowds. His support for abolitionism late in life created controversy, and at times he was subject to abuse from crowds while speaking on the topic. When asked to sum up his work, he said his central doctrine was “the infinitude of the private man.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Waldo_Emerson