Archive for February, 2010

Expect nothing and accept everything and you will never be disappointed.

February 28, 2010

Laurence Overmire

LAURENCE OVERMIRE, currently poet-in-residence on The Jeff Farias Show, is an emerging voice for conscience and consciousness in the poetry world. Popularly known as “The Genealogist-Poet,” he has had a multi-faceted career as writer, actor, director and educator. His award-winning poetry, eclectic in form, style, and subject matter, and often provocative in its direct confrontation of social issues, has been widely published in the U.S. and abroad in hundreds of magazines, journals, and anthologies. He has also authored two books of poetry, Honor and Remembrance: A Poetic Journey through American History (2007) and Report From X-Star 10 (2009), sci-fi poetry focusing on the serious social and environmental issues that face mankind. (See Books for more information.) His plays include Slingshot, A Woman in Washington’s Army, and A Scrooge Mart Christmas Carol.

http://home.comcast.net/~overmirepoetry/site/

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If we all have continuous confidence in our creativity, it would become dull and not very inspiring.

February 27, 2010

Lida van Bers

Pompeii

Lida van Bers was born and educated in ‘The Netherlands’.She has been painting full time since moving to ‘ Vancouver Island’ from Ontario.
Since living there for 16 years she has moved back to Ontario recently.
She has been a part time student for many years in Fine Arts.
Lida’s original works are very textured using different materials and bold colors.Her abstract work is her ‘soul’ she says and each piece is an adventure.
She participated in many exhibitions, received awards, published in newspapers and television.
Her work can be found in Canada, US, and Europe.

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/1-lida-van-bers.html

You have to know how to accept rejection and reject acceptance.

February 26, 2010

Ray Bradbury

 is an American fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer. Best known for his dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953) and for the science fiction stories gathered together as The Martian Chronicles (1950), Bradbury is one of the most celebrated among 20th century American writers of speculative fiction. Bradbury’s popularity has been increased by more than 20 filmed dramatizations of his works. (See Adaptations of his work.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Bradbury

The artistic temperament is a disease which afflicts amateurs.

February 25, 2010

G. K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936) was an English writer. His prolific and diverse output included philosophy, ontology, poetry, journalism, biography, Christian apologetics, fantasy and detective fiction.

Chesterton has been called the “prince of paradox”. Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: “Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out.” For example, Chesterton wrote the following:

Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it.

Chesterton is well known for his reasoned apologetics and even some of those who disagree with him have recognized the universal appeal of such works as Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man. Chesterton, as a political thinker, cast aspersions on both liberalism and conservatism, saying:

The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected.

Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an “orthodox” Christian, and came to identify such a position with Catholicism more and more, eventually converting to Roman Catholicism from Anglicanism. George Bernard Shaw, Chesterton’s “friendly enemy” according to Time, said of him, “He was a man of colossal genius”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Chesterton

All my life, my heart has yearned for a thing I cannot name.

February 24, 2010

Andre Breton

‘Le Déclin de la société bourgeoisie’ 1930

French poet, essayist, critic, and editor, chief promoter and one of the founders of Surrealist movement with Paul Eluard, Luis Buñuel, and Salvador Dali among others. Breton’s manifestoes of Surrealism are the most important theoretical statements of the movement.

http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/abreton.htm

Remember there’s no such thing as a small act of kindness. Every act creates a ripple with no logical end.

February 23, 2010

Scott Adams

Scott Raymond Adams (born June 8, 1957) is the American creator of the Dilbert comic strip and the author of several nonfiction works of satire, commentary, business, and general speculation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Adams

Passion is universal humanity. Without it religion, history, romance and art would be useless.

February 22, 2010

Honore de Balzac

Honoré de Balzac (French pronunciation: [ɔnɔʁe də balzak]) (20 May 1799 – 18 August 1850) was a French novelist and playwright. His magnum opus was a sequence of almost 100 novels and plays collectively entitled La Comédie humaine, which presents a panorama of French life in the years after the fall of Napoléon Bonaparte in 1815.

Due to his keen observation of detail and unfiltered representation of society, Balzac is regarded as one of the founders of realism in European literature. He is renowned for his multi-faceted characters; even his lesser characters are complex, morally ambiguous and fully human. Inanimate objects are imbued with character as well; the city of Paris, a backdrop for much of his writing, takes on many human qualities. His writing influenced many famous authors, including the novelists Marcel Proust, Émile Zola, Charles Dickens, Fedor Dostoyevski, Gustave Flaubert, Marie Corelli, Henry James, Jack Kerouac, and Italo Calvino as well as important philosophers such as Friedrich Engels. Many of Balzac’s works have been made into films, and they continue to inspire other writers.

An enthusiastic reader and independent thinker as a child, Balzac had trouble adapting to the teaching style of his grammar school. His willful nature caused trouble throughout his life, and frustrated his ambitions to succeed in the world of business. When he finished school, Balzac was apprenticed as a legal clerk, but he turned his back on law after wearying of its inhumanity and banal routine. Before and during his career as a writer, he attempted to be a publisher, printer, businessman, critic, and politician. He failed in all of these efforts. La Comédie Humaine reflects his real-life difficulties, and includes scenes from his own experience.

Balzac suffered from health problems throughout his life, possibly due to his intense writing schedule. His relationship with his family was often strained by financial and personal drama, and he lost more than one friend over critical reviews. In 1850, he married Ewelina Hańska, his longtime love; he died five months later.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honor%C3%A9_de_Balzac

Success is a great healer.

February 21, 2010

Grace Atherton

Life has no meaning unless one lives it with a will, at least to the limit of one’s will. Virtue, good, evil are nothing but words, unless one takes them apart in order to build something with them; they do not win their true meaning until one knows how to apply them.

February 20, 2010

Paul Gauguin

Spirit of the Dead Watching 1892

Gauguin, (Eugène-Henri-) Paul (b. June 7, 1848, Paris, Fr.–d. May 8, 1903, Atuona, Hiva Oa, Marquesas Islands, French Polynesia), one of the leading French painters of the Postimpressionist period, whose development of a conceptual method of representation was a decisive step for 20th-century art. After spending a short period with Vincent van Gogh in Arles (1888), Gauguin increasingly abandoned imitative art for expressiveness through colour. From 1891 he lived and worked in Tahiti and elsewhere in the South Pacific. His masterpieces include the early Vision After the Sermon (1888) and Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (1897-98).

Although his main achievements were to lie elsewhere, Gauguin was, to use a fanciful metaphor, nursed in the bosom of Impressionism. His attitudes to art were deeply influenced by his experience of its first exhibition, and he himself participated in those of 1880, 1881 and 1882. The son of a French journalist and a Peruvian Creole, whose mother had been a writer and a follower of Saint-Simon, he was brought up in Lima, joined the merchant navy in 1865, and in 1872 began a successful career as a stockbroker in Paris.

In 1874 he saw the first Impressionist exhibition, which completely entranced him and confirmed his desire to become a painter. He spent some 17,000 francs on works by Manet, Monet, Sisley, Pissarro, Renoir and Guillaumin. Pissarro took a special interest in his attempts at painting, emphasizing that he should `look for the nature that suits your temperament’, and in 1876 Gauguin had a landscape in the style of Pissarro accepted at the Salon. In the meantime Pissarro had introduced him to Cézanne, for whose works he conceived a great respect—so much so that the older man began to fear that he would steal his `sensations’. All three worked together for some time at Pontoise, where Pissarro and Gauguin drew pencil sketches of each other (Cabinet des Dessins, Louvre).

In 1883-84 the bank that employed him got into difficulties and Gauguin was able to paint every day. He settled for a while in Rouen, partly because Paris was too expensive for a man with five children, partly because he thought it would be full of wealthy patrons who might buy his works. Rouen proved a disappointment, and he joined his wife Mette and children, who had gone back to Denmark, where she had been born. His experience of Denmark was not a happy one and, having returned to Paris, he went to paint in Pont-Aven, a well-known resort for artists.

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/gauguin/

The world is nothing but a great desire to live and a great dissatisfaction with living.

February 19, 2010

Heraclitus

A Greek philosopher of Ephesus (near modern Kuşadası, Turkey) who was active around 500 BCE, Heraclitus propounded a distinctive theory which he expressed in oracular language. He is best known for his doctrines that things are constantly changing (universal flux), that opposites coincide (unity of opposites), and that fire is the basic material of the world. The exact interpretation of these doctrines is controversial, as is the inference often drawn from this theory that in the world as Heraclitus conceives it contradictory propositions must be true.

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/heraclitus/