Archive for the ‘Writer’ Category

What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals…

January 19, 2012

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (born David Henry Thoreau; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) (pronounced like the word thorough, with emphasis on the first syllable) was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, and leading transcendentalist. He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_David_Thoreau

 

Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy…

January 17, 2012

 Dale Carnegie

Dale Breckenridge Carnegie (originally Carnagey until 1922 and possibly somewhat later) (November 24, 1888 – November 1, 1955) was an American writer, lecturer, and the developer of famous courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, public speaking, and interpersonal skills. Born in poverty on a farm in Missouri, he was the author of How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936), a massive bestseller that remains popular today. He also wrote How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948), Lincoln the Unknown (1932), and several other books.

One of the core ideas in his books is that it is possible to change other people’s behavior by changing one’s reaction to them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale_Carnegie

All the art of living lies in a fine mingling of letting go and holding on…

January 9, 2012

Henry Ellis

Henry Ellis (1721–1806) was an explorer, author, and a colonial governor of Georgia.

Ellis was born in County Monaghan, Ireland. He was educated in law at the Temple Church in London. In May 1746, he went out as agent of a company for the discovery of the Northwest Passage. After extinguishing with difficulty a fire in his ship, he sailed to Greenland, where he exchanged commodities with the Inuit peoples on 8 July. He then proceeded to Fort Nelson, and wintered in Hayes River. He renewed his efforts in June 1747, without success, and returned to England; where he arrived on 14 October. He published an accounts of his explorations in 1748, entitled “Voyage made to Hudson’s Bay in 1746, by the Dobbs Galley and The California, to discover a Northwest Passage” and in 1750 published “Considerations relating to the Northwest Passage”. After publishing these accounts, Ellis was inducted into the Royal Society.

From 1750 to 1755, Ellis worked as a slave trader, purchasing slaves from Africa and shipping them to Jamaica.

Lord Halifax, President of the Board of Trade named Ellis lieutenant governor of Georgia, 15 August 1756. Ellis arrived at Savannah, Georgia on 16 February 1757, and on 17 May 1758, was made royal governor. His administration of the colony was highly esteemed. Recognizing the danger posed to the colony by hostile neighbors, he established a treaty with the Creeks. He published “Heat of the Weather in Georgia” in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society in 1758. The subtropical climate took its toll on his health, and he had to be removed from govener then left Georgia on 2 November 1760,and stopping in New York to request military assistance to the southern colonies.

After his return to England his knowledge of American affairs were called into requisition for developing the plan for taxing the colonies, and in return for this service he was rewarded with sinecure offices. He afterward resided in Italy, principally occupied in scientific researches.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Ellis_(governor)

Expectation is the root of all heartache…

January 8, 2012

William Shakespeare

Buy the ticket, take the ride…

January 4, 2012

Hunter S. Thompson

Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author who wrote The Rum Diary (1998), Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1971) and Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail ’72 (1973).

He is credited as the creator of Gonzo journalism, a style of reporting where reporters involve themselves in the action to such a degree that they become central figures of their stories. He is known also for his lifelong use of alcohol, LSD, mescaline, and cocaine (among other substances); his love of firearms; his inveterate hatred of Richard Nixon; and his iconoclastic contempt for authoritarianism. While suffering a bout of health problems, he committed suicide in 2005 at the age of 67.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunter_S._Thompson

The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance – it is the illusion of knowledge…

December 29, 2011

Daniel J. Boorstin

Daniel Joseph Boorstin (October 1, 1914 – February 28, 2004) was an American historian, professor, attorney, and writer. He was appointed twelfth Librarian of the United States Congress from 1975 until 1987.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_J._Boorstin

It’s never too late to be who you might have been…

December 28, 2011

George Eliot

Mary Anne (Mary Ann, Marian) Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), better known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, journalist and translator, and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She is the author of seven novels, including Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871–72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of them set in provincial England and well known for their realism and psychological insight.

She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure her works be taken seriously. Female authors were published under their own names during Eliot’s life, but she wanted to escape the stereotype of women only writing lighthearted romances. An additional factor in her use of a pen name may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny and to prevent scandals attending her relationship with the married George Henry Lewes, with whom she lived for over 20 years

Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck…

December 22, 2011

H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

H. Jackson Brown, Jr. is an American author best known for his inspirational book, Life’s Little Instruction Book, which was a New York Times bestseller (1991–1994). Its sequel Life’s Little Instruction Book: Volume 2 also made it to the same best seller list in 1993.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._Jackson_Brown,_Jr.

Every problem has a gift for you in its hands…

December 17, 2011

Richard Bach

Richard David Bach (born 23 June 1936) is an American writer. He is widely known as the author of the hugely popular 1970s best-sellers Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah, and others. His books espouse his philosophy that our apparent physical limits and mortality are merely appearance. He claims to be a direct descendant of Johann Sebastian Bach. He is noted for his love of flying and for his books related to air flight and flying in a metaphorical context. He has pursued flying as a hobby since the age of 17.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Bach

Your mind will answer most questions if you learn to relax and wait for the answer…

December 14, 2011

William S. Burroughs