Archive for the ‘Auguste Rodin’ Category

The body always expresses the spirit whose envelope it is. And for him who can see, the nude offers the richest meaning…

February 2, 2011

Auguste Rodin

Eve 1880

François-Auguste-René Rodin (12 November 1840 – 17 November 1917), known as Auguste Rodin (English pronunciation: /oʊˈɡuːst roʊˈdæn/ oh-goost roh-dan), was a French sculptor. Although Rodin is generally considered the progenitor of modern sculpture, he did not set out to rebel against the past. He was schooled traditionally, took a craftsman-like approach to his work, and desired academic recognition, although he was never accepted into Paris’s foremost school of art.

Sculpturally, Rodin possessed a unique ability to model a complex, turbulent, deeply pocketed surface in clay. Many of his most notable sculptures were roundly criticized during his lifetime. They clashed with the predominant figure sculpture tradition, in which works were decorative, formulaic, or highly thematic. Rodin’s most original work departed from traditional themes of mythology and allegory, modeled the human body with realism, and celebrated individual character and physicality. Rodin was sensitive of the controversy surrounding his work, but refused to change his style. Successive works brought increasing favor from the government and the artistic community.

From the unexpected realism of his first major figure—inspired by his 1875 trip to Italy—to the unconventional memorials whose commissions he later sought, Rodin’s reputation grew, such that he became the preeminent French sculptor of his time. By 1900, he was a world-renowned artist. Wealthy private clients sought Rodin’s work after his World’s Fair exhibit, and he kept company with a variety of high-profile intellectuals and artists. He married his life-long companion, Rose Beuret, in the last year of both their lives. His sculpture suffered a decline in popularity after his death in 1917, but within a few decades his legacy solidified. Rodin remains one of the few sculptors widely known outside the visual arts community.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auguste_Rodin

Inside you there’s an artist you don’t know about. He’s not interested in how things look different in moonlight.

February 14, 2009

Auguste Rodin

The Kiss 1896

Rodin, Auguste (1840-1917). The French artist Auguste Rodin had a profound influence on 20th-century sculpture. His works are distinguished by their stunning strength and realism. Rodin refused to ignore the negative aspects of humanity, and his works confront distress and moral weakness as well as passion and beauty.

Francois-Auguste-Rene Rodin was born on Nov. 12, 1840, in Paris. At the age of 14 he entered the Petite Ecole, a school of decorative arts in Paris. He applied three times to study at the renowned Ecole des Beaux-Arts but was rejected each time. In 1858 he began to do decorative stonework in order to make his living. Four years later the death of his sister Marie so traumatized Rodin that he entered a sacred order.

The father superior of the order recognized Rodin’s talents and encouraged him to pursue his art. In 1864 Rodin met a seamstress named Rose Beuret. She became his life companion and was the model for many of his works. That year Rodin submitted his Man with a Broken Nose to the Paris Salon. It was rejected but later accepted under the title Portrait of a Roman. Rodin traveled in 1875 to Italy, where the works of Michelangelo made a strong impression on him. The trip inspired his sculpture The Age of Bronze, which was exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1877. It caused a scandal because the critics could not believe that Rodin had not used a casting of a live model in creating so realistic a work.

The controversy brought Rodin more fame than praise might have. In 1880 he was commissioned to create a bronze door for the future Museum of Decorative Arts. Although the work was unfinished at the time of his death, it provided the basis for some of Rodin’s most influential and powerful work. In 1884 he was commissioned to create a monument that became The Burghers of Calais. His statues St. John the Baptist Preaching, Eve, The Age of Bronze, and The Thinker are world famous. Rodin died on Nov. 17, 1917, and was buried at Meudon.

When Rodin was 76 years old he gave the French government the entire collection of his own works and other art objects he had acquired. They occupy the Hotel Biron in Paris as the Musee Rodin and are still placed as Rodin set them.

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/rodin/

The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must be ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation.

November 12, 2008

Happy Birthday Auguste Rodin

Auguste Rodin is considered to be one of the greatest and most prolific sculptors of the 19th and 20th centuries. His artworks were so innovative and non-conventional that Parisian art critics had initially denounced them. Despite these rejections, Rodin’s works were well received outside of France and eventually won the recognition of his countrymen.

Born in Paris on November 12, 1840, Rodin expressed interests in art at an early age. When he was 14, he attended “la Petite Ecole”, a school for drawing and mathematics. However, devastated by the death of his beloved sister, Rodin turned towards religion and joined the Order of the Holy Sacrament in 1862. It was during this time that Rodin sculpted the bust of Father Piere-Julien Eynard. Realizing that religion was not his calling, he returned to Paris in 1963.

After a brief employment as a corporal in the French National Guard, Rodin traveled to Belgium and Italy, where he studied Michelangelo’s works. Rodin was greatly impressed and influenced by the Italian sculptor’s portrayal of muscles and human body. Contrary to artistic tradition of his time, Rodin believed that sculptures should reflect the subjects as they truly are, and not as the ideal that they should be.

In 1877, Rodin exhibited his nude masterpiece L’Age d’Airin (The Age of Bronze) in Brussels and Paris. Unfortunately, this realistic work of art was not well received. Critics accused Rodin of casting the statue directly from living models, instead of sculpting it. In time, Rodin’s true genius was recognized and the French government purchased The Age of Bronze as the first of many state acquisitions of his artworks.
The French government commissioned Rodin in 1880 to sculpt the entrance of the planned Museum of Decorative Arts. This project, called La Porte de l’Enfer (The Gates of Hell), was inspired by The Inferno, the first chapter of Dante’s Divine Comedy. The museum site was later moved from the bank of Seine to Louvre, and Rodin’s commission was then canceled. Despite the setback, Rodin continued to work on this project and created one hundred and eighty-six figures. These statues represented mainly scenes and characters from the famous poem. Some of them, such as The Thinker (a portrayal of Dante himself), Adam and Eve, are among Rodin’s most famous artworks. The Kiss was originally part of The Gates of Hell until Rodin realized that the sculpture’s joyful nature conflicted with the theme of The Gates of Hell. Unfortunately, Rodin never finished the project and the statues were cast in bronze only after his death.

Rodin’s most controversial artwork, The Nude Balzac, was created under commission in 1891. This sculpture of the famous French writer drew criticisms and hateful comments from French papers for the next 10 years. Eventually, the commission was given to another sculptor and the resulting statue was installed at the Avenue Friedland in 1902. Rodin refused to sell his Nude Balzac despite numerous offers. It was not until years after his death that the sculpture was placed at the intersection of Boulevards Raspail and Montparnasse and viewed as the masterpiece that it truly is.

By early 20th century, Rodin had become so well know that the Paris World Exposition gave him his own pavilion. Rodin displayed 170 sculptures at the 1900 Exposition. Major museums and collectors from around the world sought after his artworks and brought him both fame and fortune.

In 1908 Rodin moved his studio to the ground floor of the Biron Hotel, which was established as the official Rodin Museum in 1919. Rodin died in the Hotel on November 17, 1917 at the age of 77.

http://bronzedirect.stores.yahoo.net/rodinbio.html

Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely.

March 5, 2008

Auguste Rodin

rodinphoto1.jpgAuguste Rodin (born François-Auguste-René Rodin; November 12, 1840November 17, 1917) was a French artist, most famous as a sculptor. He was the preeminent French sculptor of his time, and remains one of the few sculptors widely recognized outside the visual arts community.

Although Rodin is generally considered the progenitor of modern sculpture, he did not set out to rebel against the past. He was schooled traditionally in Paris’s École des Beaux-Arts system, took a craftsman-like approach to his work, and desired academic recognition. Sculpturally, he possessed a unique ability to model a complex, turbulent, deeply pocketed surface in clay.

Many of Rodin’s most notable sculptures were roundly criticized during his lifetime. They clashed with the predominant figure sculpture tradition, in which works were decorative, formulaic, or highly thematic. Rodin’s most original work departed from traditional themes of mythology and allegory, modeled the human body with realism, and celebrated individual character and physicality. Rodin was sensitive to the controversy about his work, but did not change his style, and successive works brought increasing favor from the government and the artistic community.

From the unexpected realism of his first major figure—inspired by his 1875 trip to Italy—to the unconventional memorials whose commissions he later sought, Rodin’s reputation grew. By 1900, he was a world-renowned artist. Wealthy private clients sought Rodin’s work after his World’s Fair exhibit, and he kept company with a variety of high-profile intellectuals and artists. He married his life-long companion, Rose Beuret, in the last year of both their lives. His sculpture suffered a decline in popularity after his death in 1917, but within a few decades his legacy solidified.

MORE:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auguste_Rodin