Archive for the ‘Actress’ Category

You can’t be brave if you’ve only had wonderful things happen to you…

December 8, 2011

Mary Tyler Moore

One of the things I learned the hard way was that it doesn’t pay to get discouraged. Keeping busy and making optimism a way of life can restore your faith in yourself…

November 7, 2011

Lucille Ball

Self esteem comes from being faced with a challenge, whatever it might be, and meeting it.

March 17, 2010

Linda Fields

Linda Fields has been a professional singer and actress since she was 10 years old. A veteran of theatre, films, television and radio, she entered the cabaret world several years ago. Her upbeat styling and big beautiful voice has been heard in clubs and cabarets in New York, New England and throughout the Caribbean. On Broadway, she took over the lead opposite Bobby Morse in How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying when Michele Lee left the show. Linda toured the country for five years in Strictly Dishonorable with Cesar Romero, and played leads in the national companies of Sabrina and Last of the Red Hot Lovers. She had starring roles in the touring companies of Much Ado About Nothing, and Born Yesterday. She appeared in the film, Shining Star with Harvey Keitel. Off Broadway, she was a featured singer in Dear Piaf. For several years, Linda enchanted audiences on cruise ships throughout the islands, in Canada, the British Isles and Europe. A veteran of the soaps “As The World Turns” and “Edge of Night,” Linda Fields is well known in the advertising community for hundreds of on-camera, voiceover and jingle commercials.

http://www.lindafields.com/

Success is a great healer.

February 21, 2010

Grace Atherton

A good painting to me has always been like a friend. It keeps me company, comforts and inspires.

January 4, 2010

Heddy Lamarr

Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1914 – January 19, 2000) was an Austrian-born American actress and scientist. Though known primarily for her film career as a major contract star of MGM’s “Golden Age”, she also co-invented an early form of spread spectrum communications technology, a key to modern wireless communication.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedy_Lamarr

I think an artist’s responsibility is more complex than people realize.

December 30, 2009

Jodie Foster

Alicia Christian Foster, better known as Jodie Foster (born November 19, 1962), is an American actor, film director and producer.

Foster began acting in commercials at 3 years old, and her first significant role came in the 1976 film Taxi Driver as the preteen prostitute, Iris, for which she received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. She won an Academy Award for Best Actress in 1989 for playing a rape survivor in The Accused. In 1991, she starred in The Silence of the Lambs as Clarice Starling, a gifted FBI trainee, assisting in a hunt for a serial killer. This performance received international acclaim and her second Academy Award for Best Actress. She received her fourth Academy Award nomination for playing a backwoods hermit in Nell (1994). Other popular films include Maverick (1994), Contact (1997), Panic Room (2002), Flightplan (2005), Inside Man (2006), The Brave One (2007) and Nim’s Island (2008).

Foster’s films have spanned a wide variety of genres, from family films to horror. She has also won three Bafta Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, a Screen Actors Guild Award, a People’s Choice Award, and has received two Emmy nominations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jodie_Foster

Always be a first-rate version of yourself, instead of a second-rate version of somebody else.

October 18, 2009

Judy Garland

Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an American actress and singer. Through a career that spanned 45 of her 47 years, Garland attained international stardom as an actress in musical and dramatic roles, as a recording artist, and on the concert stage. Respected for her versatility, she received a Juvenile Academy Award, won a Golden Globe Award, received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for her work in films, as well as Grammy Awards and a Special Tony Award. She had a contralto singing range.

After appearing in vaudeville with her sisters, Garland was signed to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer as a teenager. There she made more than two dozen films, including nine with Mickey Rooney, and the film with which she would be most identified, The Wizard of Oz (1939). After 15 years, Garland was released from the studio but gained renewed success through record-breaking concert appearances, including a critically acclaimed Carnegie Hall concert, a well-regarded but short-lived television series, and a return to film acting beginning with A Star Is Born (1954).

Despite her professional triumphs, Garland battled personal problems throughout her life. Insecure about her appearance, her feelings were compounded by film executives who told her she was unattractive and overweight. Plied with drugs to control her weight and increase her productivity, Garland endured a decades-long struggle with addiction. Garland was plagued by financial instability, often owing hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes, and her first four of five marriages ended in divorce. She attempted suicide on a number of occasions. Garland died of an accidental drug overdose at the age of 47, leaving children Liza Minnelli, Lorna Luft, and Joey Luft.

In 1997 Garland was posthumously awarded a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and several of her recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1999, the American Film Institute placed her among the ten greatest female stars in the history of American cinema (at number eight).

It’s so rewarding when you hear the audience respond

April 26, 2009

RIP Bea Arthur

Beatrice “Bea” Arthur (May 13, 1922 – April 25, 2009) was an American comedienne, actress, and singer. In a career spanning seven decades, Arthur achieved success as the title character, Maude Findlay, on the 1970s sitcom Maude, and as Dorothy Zbornak on the 1980s sitcom The Golden Girls; she won Emmys for both roles.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beatrice_Arthur

Every victory is also a defeat.

April 14, 2008

Gloria Swanson

Gloria Swanson was born in Chicago on March 27th, 1897. Her real name is Gloria Josephine Mae Swenson. She began her career 1913 at Chicago’s Essanay Studios. Back then she was known as Gloria Mae. In 1916, she married Wallace Beery, another Essanay player, and the newlywed couple moved to Hollywood. He was to be the first of six husbands. She then shifted back-and-forth between two studios, Triangle and Paramount, where she appeared in roles that captured audiences hearts, making her a major box-office draw of the silent era. Her first lead role was in Cecil B. DeMille’s Don’t Change Your Husband (1919). DeMille would direct her in six of her box-office triumphs.

In 1925, after returning from France where she filmed Madame Sans-Gene and married her third husband, Marquis Henri de la Falaise, she teamed up with Joseph P. Kennedy, patriarch of the political clan, and began producing her own films. The two had a extra-marital affair, which was effectively hidden from her fans. Her first production effort went over budget and was not successful; but her second, Sadie Thompson (1928), was a commercial and critical success. It was daring for its time: She played a prostitute who was reformed then raped by a religious fanatic. For that role, she received her first Academy Award nomination for Best Actress.

The following year was a tumultuous one for Swanson’s professional career. Although she received her second Academy Award nomination for her role in The Trespasser, her production company also embarked on the ambitious project Queen Kelly, directed by Erich Von Stroheim. Von Stroheim created a financial mess, with numerous reshoots and the injection of erotic and perverse touches into the film. Although he was subsequently fired, the damage had been done. Although given a few screenings in Europe, the film was never shown in the United States. It marked the end of Von Stroheim’s directing career.

By this time, talkies were already entering the scene, and Swanson’s transition to the new medium was only a moderate success. She retired in 1934, but attempted several comebacks. Her most successful was her critically lauded star turn in Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard, where she played a role with many parallels to her own life. She received her third Academy Award nomination for that film. Her final film appearance was in 1974’s Airport 1975, where she played herself. She died on April 4th, 1983.

http://www.geocities.com/hollywood/theater/6980/swanson.htm