Archive for July, 2010

Trust in yourself. Your perceptions are often far more accurate than you are willing to believe.

July 20, 2010

Claudia Black

Claudia Black (not the sci-fi, Farscape actress) is a renowned addiction author, speaker and trainer internationally recognized for her pioneering and contemporary work with family systems and addictive disorders.

http://claudiablack.com/contents/index.php/2.html

Life is more important than art; that’s what makes art important…

July 19, 2010

James Baldwin

File:Jamesbaldwin.jpg

Most of Baldwin’s work deals with racial and sexual issues in the mid-20th century in the United States. His novels are notable for the personal way in which they explore questions of identity as well as the way in which they mine complex social and psychological pressures related to being black and homosexual well before the social, cultural or political equality of these groups was improved.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Baldwin_(writer)

It’s not what you look at that matters~it’s what you see.

July 17, 2010

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (born David Henry Thoreau; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American author, poet, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, philosopher, and leading transcendentalist. He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_David_Thoreau

“I think of life as a good book. The further you get into it, the more it begins to make sense.”

July 16, 2010

Harold Kushner

He is the author of a best selling book on the problem of evil, When Bad Things Happen to Good People. Written following the death of his son, Aaron, from the premature aging disease, progeria, the book deals with questions about human suffering, God, Omnipotence and Theodicy.

Kushner has written a number of other popular theological books, such as How Good Do We Have to Be? (Dedicated to his grandson, Carl), To Life! and many others. In collaboration with the late Chaim Potok, Kushner co-edited Etz Hayim: A Torah Commentary, the new official Torah commentary of the Conservative movement, which was jointly published in 2001 by the Rabbinical Assembly and the Jewish Publication Society. His Living a Life That Matters became a best seller in the fall of 2001. Kushner’s book, The Lord Is My Shepherd, was a meditation on the Twenty-Third Psalm released in 2003. Kushner also wrote a response to Simon Wiesenthal’s question of forgiveness in the book The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Kushner

Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things.

July 15, 2010

Robert Brault

a

 free-lance writer who has contributed to magazines and newspapers in the USA for over 40 years

http://www.robertbrault.com/

A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his mind is a craftsman; but a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist.

July 14, 2010

St. Thomas Aquinas

The Temptation of St. Thomas Aquinas by Diego Rodriguez de Silva y Velazquez

Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P., also Thomas of Aquin or Aquino; (Aquino, 1225 – Fossanova, 7 March 1274) was an Italian priest of the Catholic Church in the Dominican Order, and an immensely influential philosopher and theologian in the tradition of scholasticism, known as Doctor Angelicus (the Angelic Doctor) and Doctor Communis or Doctor Universalis (the Common or Universal Doctor). He is frequently referred to as Thomas because “Aquinas” refers to his residence rather than his surname. He was the foremost classical proponent of natural theology, and the father of the Thomistic school of philosophy and theology. His influence on Western thought is considerable, and much of modern philosophy was conceived as a reaction against, or as an agreement with, his ideas, particularly in the areas of ethics, natural law and political theory.

Aquinas is held in the Catholic Church to be the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood. The works for which he is best-known are the Summa Theologica and the Summa Contra Gentiles. One of the 33 Doctors of the Church, he is considered the Church’s greatest theologian and philosopher. Pope Benedict XV declared: “The Church has declared Thomas’ doctrine to be her own.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Aquinas

Satisfaction lies in the effort, not in the attainment. Full effort is full victory.

July 13, 2010

Mahatma Gandhi

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi *(2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the pre-eminent political and spiritual leader of India during the Indian independence movement. He pioneered satyagraha—resistance to tyranny through mass civil disobedience, a philosophy firmly founded upon ahimsa, or total nonviolence, which helped India to gain independence, and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. Gandhi is often referred to as Mahatma Gandhi Sanskrit: महात्मा mahātmā or “Great Soul”, an honorific first applied to him by Rabindranath Tagore), and in India also as Bapu (Gujarati: બાપુ, bāpu or “Father”). He is officially honoured in India as the Father of the Nation; his birthday, 2 October, is commemorated there as Gandhi Jayanti, a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Non-Violence.

Gandhi first employed civil disobedience while an expatriate lawyer in South Africa, during the resident Indian community’s struggle there for civil rights. After his return to India in 1915, he organised protests by peasants, farmers, and urban labourers concerning excessive land-tax and discrimination. After assuming leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns to ease poverty, expand women’s rights, build religious and ethnic amity, end untouchability, and increase economic self-reliance. Above all, he aimed to achieve Swaraj or the independence of India from foreign domination. Gandhi famously led his followers in the Non-cooperation movement that protested the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (240 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930. Later, in 1942, he launched the Quit India civil disobedience movement demanding immediate independence for India. Gandhi spent a number of years in jail in both South Africa and India.

As a practitioner of ahimsa, he swore to speak the truth and advocated that others do the same. Gandhi lived modestly in a self-sufficient residential community and wore the traditional Indian dhoti and shawl, woven with yarn he had hand spun himself. He ate simple vegetarian food, experimented for a time with a fruitarian diet, and undertook long fasts as a means of both self-purification and social protest.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohandas_Karamchand_Gandhi

The distinguishing characteristics of mind are of a subjective sort; we know them only from the contents of our own consciousness.

July 12, 2010

Wilhelm Wundt

Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt (16 August 1832 – 31 August 1920) was a German medical doctor, psychologist, physiologist, philosopher, and professor, known today as one of the founding figures of modern psychology. He is widely regarded as the “father of experimental psychology”.[3][4][5] In 1879, Wundt founded one of the first formal laboratories for psychological research at the University of Leipzig.

By creating this laboratory he was able to explore the nature of religious beliefs, identify mental disorders and abnormal behavior, and map damaged areas of the human brain. By doing this he was able to establish psychology as a separate science from other topics. He also formed the first journal for psychological research in 1881.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Wundt

A lot of people have great ideas, but nothing in the world is cheaper than a good idea with no action.

July 11, 2010

Anonymous

Never follow the crowd.

July 10, 2010

Bernard Baruch

Bernard Mannes Baruch (pronounced /bəˈruːk/; August 19, 1870 – June 20, 1965) was an American financier, stock-market speculator, statesman, and political consultant. After his success in business, he devoted his time toward advising U.S. Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt on economic matters.

.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Baruch