A work of art that does not begin with emotion is not art.

Paul Cezanne

Pyramid of Skulls 1901

Paul Cézanne (French pronunciation: [pɔl seˈzan]; 19 January 1839 – 22 October 1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th century conception of artistic endeavour to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. Cézanne can be said to form the bridge between late 19th century Impressionism and the early 20th century’s new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism. The line attributed to both Matisse and Picasso that Cézanne “is the father of us all” cannot be easily dismissed.

Cézanne’s work demonstrates a mastery of design, colour, composition and draftsmanship. His often repetitive, sensitive and exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognizable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields, at once both a direct expression of the sensations of the observing eye and an abstraction from observed nature. The paintings convey Cézanne’s intense study of his subjects, a searching gaze and a dogged struggle to deal with the complexity of human visual perception.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_C%C3%A9zanne

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One Response to “A work of art that does not begin with emotion is not art.”

  1. Jonjo Powers Says:

    Happy New Year, Karyn and all!

    Bravo, Cezanne! Art is a visceral experience and all the analysis in the world never changes that.

    Charlie Parker said: “Music is your own experience, your thoughts, your wisdom. If you don’t live it, it won’t come out your horn.”

    All the lessons of technique exist in order for the artist to transcend technique and reveal how she or he feels about the subject.

    We’re off and running on a great 2010!

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