Archive for January 31st, 2009

Better murder an infant in its cradle than nurse an unacted desire.

January 31, 2009

William Blake

The Ancient of Days 1794

 Blake, William (b. Nov. 28, 1757, London–d. Aug. 12, 1827, London)
English poet, painter, engraver; one of the earliest and greatest figures of Romanticism.
Blake was born on Nov. 28, 1757, in London. His father ran a hosiery shop. William, the third of five children, went to school only long enough to learn to read and write, and then he worked in the shop until he was 14. When he saw the boy’s talent for drawing, Blake’s father apprenticed him to an engraver.

At 25 Blake married Catherine Boucher. He taught her to read and write and to help him in his work. They had no children. They worked together to produce an edition of Blake’s poems and drawings, called Songs of Innocence. Blake engraved both words and pictures on copper printing plates. Catherine made the printing impressions, hand-colored the pictures, and bound the books. The books sold slowly, for a few shillings each. Today a single copy is worth many thousands of dollars.

Blake’s fame as an artist and engraver rests largely on a set of 21 copperplate etchings to illustrate the Book of Job in the Old Testament. However, he did much work for which other artists and engravers got the credit. Blake was a poor businessman, and he preferred to work on subjects of his own choice rather than on those that publishers assigned him.

 Blake died on Aug. 12, 1827.

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/blake/